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9 Month Old Typical Eating?

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  • 9 Month Old Typical Eating?

    If you have infants In care, how often do they eat and how much? I have one that will refuse and even spit out bottles and food, all day. I’m worried and parents are pushing back saying they’re not worried. Yesterday was a good day and 4 ounces and 1 jar baby food in 9 hours.

    Edited to add: my concern is that she doesn’t drink any formula. The food is always offered along with meals, but refusing the formula is what concerns me.
    Last edited by Sahm121; 3 weeks ago.

  • #2
    That's not much formula/breastmilk at all, but it is a lot of squishy, liquid-filled solids. Up until one year, the solid foods are supplementary to the fluids. I don't do much with baby food. I just mince up whatever of my snacks and lunches the infant has already been exposed to at home, and let them play with it on their tray while the big kids eat.

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    • #3
      I don't serve jar foods at all and would not worry too much about how much they are eating right now. They are thinning out and lengthening long bones in order to prepare for walking at that age, so not being hungry is their body and hunger signals working correctly. Developmentally. I would just continue to offer, formula first. If they finish the minimum serving of formula, per meal, then I would offer finger foods. Table foods is not necessary until 12 months, it is mostly educational.

      Pushing someone to eat, who is not hungry, based on a clock is setting them up for eating issues later in life. They do not need the same amount of calories everyday like adults. Some days my infants eat two lunches right and sleep a lot more before a big growth spurt. I gladly give it to them and allow them to sleep whenever they want. I watch their signs and developmental stages closely.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Pestle View Post
        That's not much formula/breastmilk at all, but it is a lot of squishy, liquid-filled solids. Up until one year, the solid foods are supplementary to the fluids. I don't do much with baby food. I just mince up whatever of my snacks and lunches the infant has already been exposed to at home, and let them play with it on their tray while the big kids eat.
        Maybe I’m not understanding - One infant jar of baby food in a whole day is too much?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Cat Herder View Post
          I don't serve jar foods at all and would not worry too much about how much they are eating right now. They are thinning out and lengthening long bones in order to prepare for walking at that age, so not being hungry is their body and hunger signals working correctly. Developmentally. I would just continue to offer, formula first. If they finish the minimum serving of formula, per meal, then I would offer finger foods. Table foods is not necessary until 12 months, it is mostly educational.

          Pushing someone to eat, who is not hungry, based on a clock is setting them up for eating issues later in life. They do not need the same amount of calories everyday like adults. Some days my infants eat two lunches right and sleep a lot more before a big growth spurt. I gladly give it to them and allow them to sleep whenever they want. I watch their signs and developmental stages closely.
          I reread my post and i should clarify - My issue is that she’s not drinking any formula at all during the day. I’m not concerned about food, I offer the baby/finger foods and she plays with them and sometimes eats. But no bottles at all, she just spits it out or closes her mouth, and of course I follow her cues. But I’ve never had a baby at daycare that didn’t want bottles. Sometimes they drink less when they’re transitioning to food, but no food and no milk is worrying me.
          Last edited by Sahm121; 3 weeks ago.

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          • #6
            I would restrict all other foods until formula is taken. I'd also check the nipples for flow rate and rule out a possible ear infection. Maybe even try a sippy cup, early.

            Then, I'd wait for any other symptoms or changes.
            Last edited by Cat Herder; 3 weeks ago.

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            • #7
              Has she always refused her formula? Did her parents recently switch formula because of the shortage? If so, maybe she doesn't like the taste? I've had breastfed babies refuse the bottle all day long and then make up for it at home with mom. As long as I was still seeing wet diapers and constipation wasn't a problem, I let parents know the baby wasn't drinking her but didn't worry too much about it. When I switched my daughter to formula and she wouldn't drink it, I talked to my doctor about it. She asked if I had ever tasted the formula I was giving her. I hadn't so that night, I took a spoonful. It was disgusting! I switched her to another formula - one that I thought tasted much better, and she drank it with no problem.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Sahm121 View Post
                If you have infants In care, how often do they eat and how much? I have one that will refuse and even spit out bottles and food, all day. I’m worried and parents are pushing back saying they’re not worried. Yesterday was a good day and 4 ounces and 1 jar baby food in 9 hours.

                Edited to add: my concern is that she doesn’t drink any formula. The food is always offered along with meals, but refusing the formula is what concerns me.
                I always offer the formula first. Once that’s consumed I offer foods. I also skip jarred foods and feed regular menu items prepared for baby’s eating abilities

                If she’s simply refusing formula no matter what, I’d have DCM talk with child’s pediatrician to find a menu that suits her preferences and meets her nutritional needs.

                My own child refused formula at 7-8 months and began eating regular foods for all meals/snacks. He was switched to whole milk and monitored for proper weight gain and growth.

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                • #9
                  Quick update - so talked to dcd and infant is refusing to eat/drink at home too and they’re concerned since she’s very low on the growth curve. Similar thing happened (refusing to eat/drink) in September and I sent child home
                  (no wet diaper, signs of dehydration, etc.) and they brought a note that following Monday saying the genetic ‘can return once symptoms are gone’ note, Dcd now says their doctor sent to ER for evaluation and IV then and they haven’t had a chance to follow up. Then says oh we have a different formula at home maybe that’s it.

                  I don’t even know where to start. We’re in November…
                  im going to continue to offer bottles and log wet diapers and amount consumed in a day. I won’t offer any jar baby food or anything else they send unless she’s drinking her milk.

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                  • #10
                    I just remembered that I did have another infant that was refusing bottles here. It was a while back. It turned out to be because I was heating them, and they served them cold at home. Just another thought.

                    The difference in bottled, city and well water can cause some refusals, too.
                    Last edited by Cat Herder; 3 weeks ago.

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                    • #11
                      I would offer formula before anything else. My last infant was tough about eating. I quickly learned I had to feed her on her terms and not her parents written schedule.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sahm121 View Post

                        Maybe I’m not understanding - One infant jar of baby food in a whole day is too much?
                        No; it's not too much food to take in. Just, the way that I feed infants under one year, it's a lot of one particular food that they will substitute for their formula. Mostly, under a year, they are exploring a variety of foods and developing their fine motor dexterity, and still getting the majority of their nutrition from formula/breastmilk. So I don't like them to fill up on baby food. But fed is best and if this child is on a formula embargo, I guess you do what you have to do while also throwing it back to the parents to deal with.

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                        • Sahm121
                          Sahm121 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Thank you! I have another 9 month old all on regular cut up table foods and he eats after his bottle and until he’s full. I wanted to make sure the feeding guidelines didn’t change and I missed it lol!
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