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  • Paper Towels

    What kind of a paper towel holder do you use in the bathroom?

    My 4cs person said I either need a towel for each kid, or paper towels.

  • #2
    I use Kleenex disposable hand towels in the cardboard box that sits on the towel rack and dispenses one at a time. I buy them in cases of 6 boxes.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a tri-fold paper towl dispenser I got at Sams years ago.

      Comment


      • Gemma
        Gemma commented
        Editing a comment
        I use the same type of paper

      • Blackcat31
        Blackcat31 commented
        Editing a comment
        I also have a "commercial" type paper towel dispense with tri-fold paper towels from Sam's Club. It was actually really cheap. I think I paid $24 for the dispenser and the box of paper towels usually runs about $25-30 but it lasts for months! I love it! Best investment I've made in a long time. I also bought a commercial handsoap dispenser thinking it would be easy and convenient but darn if the kids can use it with out making a mess..... Grrr! lol!

      • Annalee
        Annalee commented
        Editing a comment
        I tried the cheap from LTD commodities soap dispenser.....useless for kids! LOL

    • #4
      I have 4 Pacific Blue in 2 different styles

      Comment


      • #5
        We leave ours out on the counter and the kids are able to reach it no problem. We put a new one out as needed
        Christy Sewell

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        • #6
          I don't, they all use the same towel. I put a fresh one out in the morning and at nap time. They all get a fresh baby washcloth to clean with, but they share a towel to dry.
          284878

          Comment


          • Alwaysgreener
            Alwaysgreener commented
            Editing a comment
            Gemma Your comment got me wondering so I looked up the handwashing rule and single-use towel is listed in the TA as a best practice, not as a regulation. Hopefully, you are wrong and you would not get cited for best practice, if you do, they are just fishing for something.

          • Gemma
            Gemma commented
            Editing a comment
            I won't get cited because I use paper towel...I just assumed a single towel would not be ok since I did get cited once for not washing my hands in between washing kids hands...like I'm washing all the kids, iI didn't think I had to stop and wash my own hands each time before washing the next kid ...so that's why I'm confused when they're ok with drying the kids with a single towel...makes no sense to me

          • Alwaysgreener
            Alwaysgreener commented
            Editing a comment
            That's funny, I never thought about hand washing that way. So you we're told to wash your hands first and then dck hands and then yours again, then repeating this with each kid?
            I wonder what they'd say about my process. I put soap on the kids hands, then soap on my hands rub my hands and rub their hands at the same time, (modeling how to wash hands) and then rinse.

        • #7
          Alwaysgreener, yes it is a QRIS assessment area where I am discounted points. Best practice does not trump assessment guidelines. I have 5 state entities that inspect my program, so no same-towel for me!

          Comment


          • Alwaysgreener
            Alwaysgreener commented
            Editing a comment
            I know your States QRIS is farther evolved then ours. I am thankful for that.
            Gemma and I are in the same state. So I was referring to our state rules definition wording states "best practice". If our rules required me to use single-use towels, I would. And at this time our qris doesn't haven't on a list of things to do to get points if it did it would be an easy point and I would take it. When I opened I was like brush the kids teeth, no. But then it was on qris and I got points so I did it. (Currently the state is not recommending that we brush teeth so I have stopped for the pandemic but the kids keep asking to. I might have to start up again) ---
            Last edited by Alwaysgreener; 06-24-2021, 08:12 AM.

        • #8
          I have a basket on the bathroom counter with a big stack of cotton washcloths I buy in bundles at Walmart. After a child washes hands, they take the top washcloth, dry their hands in it, and toss it into a basket under the counter. When the stack starts running low, I wash the used ones.

          Comment


          • Blackcat31
            Blackcat31 commented
            Editing a comment
            I like this idea but I couldnt imagine the laundry. I have 8 kids here today. So far they've all used the bathroom (washed their hands etc) upon arrival and then used it again to wash hands again after transitioning from a.m. snack to next activity. One washed her hands because she was picking her nose repeatedly, another washed their hands because they picked something "slimey" off the front steps and two others washed their hands because they were playing with Play-doh. Oh and one washed their hands because they sneezed and got snot on their hands. lol! That would be 21+ wash cloths and it's not even lunch time yet.
            I don't know maybe it's just me but I swear someone is in the bathroom all day washing their hands so I doubt I could manage that much laundry.

          • Cat Herder
            Cat Herder commented
            Editing a comment
            Oh, it would never work with our classroom sink, the thing runs all day long. lol!! I meant in the bathroom since I generally only have 1-3 potty trained kids that use that sink enrolled at a time, here.

          • Rockgirl
            Rockgirl commented
            Editing a comment
            The laundry isn’t actually that bad. I’m doing about two loads of washcloths per week….I have a ton of them. The kids stack them after they’re dry. They have to wash their hands first, though! 😆

        • #9
          Originally posted by Rockgirl View Post
          I have a basket on the bathroom counter with a big stack of cotton washcloths I buy in bundles at Walmart. After a child washes hands, they take the top washcloth, dry their hands in it, and toss it into a basket under the counter. When the stack starts running low, I wash the used ones.
          That's what I've done for many years. Now my licensor says that used washcloths have to be treated the same as garbage so I have to use a can with a lid for the used washcloths. Oh well, since the pandemic began I went to touchless soap dispensers and paper towels.

          Comment


          • #10
            These are my regs, I think they are becoming the norm across al states soon.

            Rule Type: Core Rule Intent To prevent the spread of infection and to ensure staff and children use safe and healthy hygiene practices. Clarification According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, handwashing is the simplest and most important basic measure for preventing the spread of infection in child care facilities. Many studies have shown that unwashed or improperly washed hands are the primary carriers of infection. When children and staff wash their hands at the proper times and with the proper technique, it can drastically reduce the amount of illness in the Home. Hands and forearms should first be wet and then rubbed vigorously as they are washed with soap for at least twenty seconds using comfortably warm, running water (between 60 and 120 degrees Fahrenheit). This removes organisms such as virus-containing particles and bacteria from the skin and rinses them away. Thorough rinsing should be followed by drying hands with a single-use or disposable towel. Bar soap is often left sitting in a pool of water, especially when many people are using it frequently. A soap bar, which is always wet, is a good place for germs to grown and multiply. Since these germs could spread when others use the soap, liquid soap should be used instead. Liquid soap should be safe for children (i.e., free of a warning to “Keep out of reach of children”) and within children’s reach during handwashing activities to foster independence and allow children to practice their self-help skills. Hand sanitizer should not be used in place of soap and water handwashing. “Contamination by any other means” includes, but is not limited to, wiping children’s noses, cleaning a table, and sneezing into the hand. The use of single-use gloves is not a substitute for washing hands. For example, if a staff person wears gloves while changing diapers, that person should discard the single-use gloves and wash his/her hands after each diaper change. Handwashing requirements apply to diapered children as well as non-diapered children. If a child is asleep when he/she arrives at the Home, staff do not need to wake the child to wash his/her hands, but the child’s hands should be washed as soon as the child awakens. Caregivers should provide handwashing assistance as needed depending on each child’s developmental level. They should also teach children how to wash their hands then monitor children’s hand hygiene practices.

            Indicators ✓ Observe the handwashing practices of the staff and children. Observe whether staff remind children to wash their hands. If not observed, ask the Provider about handwashing routines. ✓ Check sink areas for liquid soap and warm running water.

            Comment


            • #11
              Originally posted by Cat Herder View Post
              These are my regs, I think they are becoming the norm across al states soon.

              Rule Type: Core Rule Intent To prevent the spread of infection and to ensure staff and children use safe and healthy hygiene practices. Clarification According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, handwashing is the simplest and most important basic measure for preventing the spread of infection in child care facilities. Many studies have shown that unwashed or improperly washed hands are the primary carriers of infection. When children and staff wash their hands at the proper times and with the proper technique, it can drastically reduce the amount of illness in the Home. Hands and forearms should first be wet and then rubbed vigorously as they are washed with soap for at least twenty seconds using comfortably warm, running water (between 60 and 120 degrees Fahrenheit). This removes organisms such as virus-containing particles and bacteria from the skin and rinses them away. Thorough rinsing should be followed by drying hands with a single-use or disposable towel. Bar soap is often left sitting in a pool of water, especially when many people are using it frequently. A soap bar, which is always wet, is a good place for germs to grown and multiply. Since these germs could spread when others use the soap, liquid soap should be used instead. Liquid soap should be safe for children (i.e., free of a warning to “Keep out of reach of children”) and within children’s reach during handwashing activities to foster independence and allow children to practice their self-help skills. Hand sanitizer should not be used in place of soap and water handwashing. “Contamination by any other means” includes, but is not limited to, wiping children’s noses, cleaning a table, and sneezing into the hand. The use of single-use gloves is not a substitute for washing hands. For example, if a staff person wears gloves while changing diapers, that person should discard the single-use gloves and wash his/her hands after each diaper change. Handwashing requirements apply to diapered children as well as non-diapered children. If a child is asleep when he/she arrives at the Home, staff do not need to wake the child to wash his/her hands, but the child’s hands should be washed as soon as the child awakens. Caregivers should provide handwashing assistance as needed depending on each child’s developmental level. They should also teach children how to wash their hands then monitor children’s hand hygiene practices.

              Indicators ✓ Observe the handwashing practices of the staff and children. Observe whether staff remind children to wash their hands. If not observed, ask the Provider about handwashing routines. ✓ Check sink areas for liquid soap and warm running water.
              Agreed!

              Comment


              • #12
                My state rules say "A child's hands must be washed with soap and water when soiled, after the use of a toilet or toilet training chair, and before eating a meal or snack. The provider shall monitor and assist the child who needs help.

                Caregivers shall wash their hands with soap and water after each diaper change, after assisting a child on the toilet, after washing the diapering surface, and before food preparation. Hands must be dried on a single use towel."

                It only mentions single use paper towels for caregivers but not children. Elsewhere in my rules though it does say: "Separate towels, wash cloths, drinking cups, combs, and other personal articles must be used for each child".

                Comment


                • Cat Herder
                  Cat Herder commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Even our mandatory "posted" charts show a picture of the paper towel dispenser you have. I just don't want to deal with the screw in my walls. They always loosen and the thing starts wiggling around and damaging the wall over tome. Then I have to yank it down, fill the holes, find a new place to put it back up. It was such a hassle with drywall. The one that sits up on the towel holder has been great, so far. Every now and again one will show up with the box crushed and I am relegated to handing them out for 6 months of so. That is also a huge PITA. LOL!
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